Early Signs of Fall in the Garden

The mood out there is changing here in our British Columbia garden. Things are still dry and colours are changing. We have fire bans. Clematis are displaying their lovely seedheads. There are many kinds of seed pods ready for seed collection, the ornamental grasses have developed their inflorescences, late blooming flowers have begun. I have already cut back some plants. Will my mulch pile last? Have the bulbs arrived at your favourite nursery? Are you ready for the fall garden? There are beauties yet to come!

Have a walk-about in this week’s garden with me. This is some of what is now in bloom.

Oakleaf Hydrangea and Plum Passion Hydrangea

(a senior moment..Ah yes, Lycesteria formosanum. Thanks to Barry!)  

Thalictrum

Phlox and Tricyrtis

EchinaceaIMG_20170821_080505B

Helenium and a creeping aster

Agapanthus

Cardoon

Aster

  Anemonopsis macrophylla   

Calluna

The ornamental grass Panicum ‘Cheyenne Sky’ is showing beautiful red tones.
Lavender Munstead is still blooming.

Clematis Sonnette, Triternata x rubromarginata and Gravetye Beauty

    

Some blooms are fading or changing colour. Here you see Yarrow paprika fading to pale yellow.

And here you see Hydrangea Pinky Winky slowly changing from white to pink

Some late bloomers have begun, such as this variegated Sedum.

Some Clematis are displaying beautiful seedheads.

IMG_20170821_074806B

Other plants have produced exotic seed pods.

These are blue poppy seeds.

More Meconopsis seed.IMG_20170821_075541B

Here are Astrantia seeds

These are Martagon lily pods of seed.

Amsonia produces these pods.

Some plants develop buds in August and September for next year.
Rhododendron

Magnolia

This is Disporum Night Heron which produces berries which will turn darker over time.

This Cotoneaster tree produces berries which turn a beautiful red.

In the future we will have  Anemone ‘Honorine Jobert’

Super tall Asters! Yes, I did prune these back before Fathers Day!

and Kirengeshoma palmata

But now is the season for blackberries to display their fruit. YUM!

Now we are working away at spreading mulch.

Every year is different. The heavy tasks get harder as we age, but the excitement of a garden and its beauty never fades!

*****

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6 thoughts on “Early Signs of Fall in the Garden

  1. I think your senior moment is Lycesteria formosanum…… tried to grow it here, but you know what happens to overzealous Zone pushers. I am so envious of all of those Meconopsis seed pods.

    Like

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